FAQs

New Owners Current Tenants New Tenants Prospective Tenants

This is a full property management service. We find the tenants, screen the tenants, enforce the lease, collect rent, do inspections, coordinate maintenance issues, handle move outs and move ins, take care of evictions – if needed. In short we, take care of all the details and work so you don’t have to. You will have your own online portal to access anytime you want. You will be able to retrieve current and past monthly statements, invoices, tax documents, and annual summary, all from the convenience of your own portal. We will take care of you and the property.

Lets start with what we do not charge. Unique to us, we do not markup service calls. If we have to call out maintenance you will get a copy of their bill and you will not be charge a penny more than what they charged. With other management companies you won’t even know you are getting a markup on costs. That is why they will keep the invoice from you and won’t let you talk directly with the technician. We keep everything above board and let you see what you are paying for.

Monthly management fees: 8% of the rent plus $9 a month for an attorney retainer fee. The attorney fee covers the cost of an eviction and court costs, if needed. It also covers the cost of legal advice regarding situations that may arise with a tenant and the lease.

Periodic fees: These include those listed below. If you are signing up 10 or more units jump to the Bulk Discount at the bottom of this section.

One time sign up fee: $100 (waived if signing up more than one unit).

Leasing fee: 12% of the rent. Charged each time we need to find a new tenant because someone moves (typically once every 1-3 years). This includes the costs of advertising with online pay sites.

Screening fees: $25 per person, only for applications that are processed but they do not sign up (typically there are 0-3 screening fees during the course of filling a vacancy). This is different than most management companies do it. Having your best interest in mind is what drove us to do screening fees this way rather than charging them to applicants. When charging the applicant it actually causes them to first consider other places or makes them delay submitting their application. Thinking through this, we realized that every day your place sits empty costs you more money than a screening fee is even worth. This fee structure actually saves you money because we get your vacancy filled faster. Now, this does not mean you get charged for every application that comes in. We want to keep this as low as possible. If someone’s application is approved and they sign up then there is no application fee. It’s only for those that get to the final stages of the application process and then they are denied for credit and/or background or, if approved, they change their mind and don’t sign a lease. To prevent unnecessary screening fees, we first run them through a pre-screening that can weed out those that couldn’t be approved anyway. The pre-screening checks are: tenants must have toured the property, each adult must have submitted an individual application with a current pay stub and picture ID, applications need to be filled out properly with no disqualifying factors listed, applications are screened through our attorneys database – comprised of evictions and collections from hundreds of property managers over several decades. Only after passing all those pre-screenings, we do a credit and background check with the potential of a screening fee.

Bulk discount: If you are signing up 10 or more units we greatly simplify and reduce the fees. For 10 or more units we only charge the 8% management fee. All the other services are still included and all the others fees are waived.

The property owner is responsible for the property’s bills and payments.

In addition to a professional For Rent sign at the property and being listed on our website, it will be posted to dozens of online classified websites and refreshed weekly. Once we have the ad written and the pictures uploaded, our top of the line software is capable of sending the ads out to all the big websites with the simple click of a button. Anyone looking will easily be able to find your property for rent.

Usually 2-3 weeks, sometimes less. Vacancies are a major focus for us because we understand a vacancy can be a property owners biggest expense. Because we jump right on it, we often succeed at getting new tenants lined up to move in before the old tenants have even moved out.

When deciding what to charge for rent we will gladly help by giving professional advice, but ultimately the property owner is the boss. Once it’s listed we will monitor how it’s going and give you feed back and suggestions if a change is needed. Reviewing other ads for similar homes nearby is a great way to get an idea of what price range you can expect.

If the lawn is clearly divided for each unit, then it is typically the tenants responsibility to mow, weed and fertilize as needed. There is no required care regiment that they need to do though. It just comes down to, if the lawn looks good, then they are doing a good job. If the yard is pretty complicated, with a lot of shrubbery, flower beds, gardens, and such, then we should consider having a yard care service take care of it and have it included with the rent.

Typically, for a rental, the simpler the yard is, the better.

If the yard is more of a community area and not easily divided for each unit, like a 4-plex might have, then the owner is responsible for the cost of maintaining it.

If it’s a single family residence or unit that has its own individual meters and billing, then it can be the tenants responsibility. For any utilities that have one meter for multiple units it’s typically the property owners responsibility or paid by an HOA.

Ultimately, that bill is the property owners responsibility and if it doesn’t get paid, the HOA comes after the owner not the tenant. It’s not wise to leave that responsibility in the tenants’ hands. In turn we always charge as much for rent as we can to help cover these type of expenses for the property owner.

Yes. Most places we manage do not allow pets and that is always what I recommend.

That can be a tough question, but with the advice of our landlord attorney we have good policies just for these circumstances. By law we can not tell someone they are not allowed to have a service or support animal.  Nor can we charge extra fees for them.  Because of this, our industry has been overrun with fraud when it comes to these requests.  Many people think that just by calling their pet an emotional support animal it is simply a way to get around the rules.  The fact is, unless it meets certain requirements, it is fraud and it is illegal.  Because so many people do this it makes things much more difficult for those that have true medical needs.  As defined by the law, these people must have a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life functions and they need their animal to help them perform those major life functions.  Because so many people have been committing fraud by illegally saying they need an ESA, when in reality it’s just a pet, I do my due diligence before I approve their request.

To get an animal approved they need to fit the definition of handicapped, as defined by the law: “Handicap” means, with respect to a person –

(1) having a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more of such person’s major life activities.
(2) having a record of having such an impairment, or
(3) being regarded as having such an impairment, but such term does not include current, illegal use of or addiction to a controlled substance.

If they fit that definition I will give them some forms that they need to fill out with their Doctor, signing their names that they fit the definition. I will then contact their Doctor to verify the information.

As a licensed property management company we are subject to and comply with Federal Fair Housing Laws. Because of that, it is important that we treat every application the same and screen them all against the same criteria. We are not able to let individual owners make their own decisions about who is approved and who is not. Our screening process if very affective though. There are several stages of the screening process that an application must pass to be approved. Some of those screens are: vetting through our attorneys extensive database with decades of tenant evictions and collections from hundreds of property managers. Verifiable employment and income, sufficient income to afford paying the rent, and a credit and criminal background check. Once they pass all the screenings we approve their application. After they sign the lease we will notify you of the good news that your rental has been filled.

We have a thorough screening process and we review applications on a first come first serve basis. The first approved applicant that signs the lease and pays the deposit gets the home. Doing it in this manner, rather than collecting applications and picking one, helps prevent any claim of a Federal Fair Housing violation and it’s the most fair way to do it. Our screening process is very affective though. There are several stages of the screening process that an applicant must pass to be approved. Some of those screens are: vetting through our attorneys extensive database with decades of tenant evictions and collections from hundreds of property managers. Verifiable employment and income, sufficient income to afford paying the rent, and a credit and criminal background check.

Disbursements to owners are automatically deposited into their bank accounts on the 10th of each month, or the next business day if that is a weekend or holiday. On the same day that you get paid you will also receive an email informing you there is a new monthly statement in your online portal.

To report a maintenance issue, tenants have the ease of using an app on their phone to log into their portal and report the issue. They can also upload pictures with their maintenance request to help show the problem. Once they submit their maintenance request, our office is notified and the proper technician is assigned to schedule an appointment and take care of the issue. If it is expected to be over $300, or looks like it’s turning into an expense that will exceed $300, they will pause and contact the property owner for authorization to proceed. If it’s expected to be under $300 they’ll proceed with the repair and you will see the charge and the invoice with your monthly statement.

If it is an after hours emergency, the voicemail greeting for the office will give the tenant the phone number to our emergency crew. Once they arrive at the home they will get the situation under control, to prevent further damage from spreading. The crew will then wait to proceed with further repairs until the property owner has been contacted, usually the next business day, and the remaining work has been approved.

No.  We try the best we can to charge the appropriate party.  Plugged drains, lightbulbs, batteries, air filters, damage caused by the tenant (on purpose or not) are all things that we can usually charge to tenants.  Generally, owner’s are responsible for the costs of normal wear and tear, general maintenance, and things needing to be repaired or replaced from normal usage.  We do require that properties receive proper repairs as needed.  We stay away from the “duck tape and bubble gum repairs” that some might want to do to “kick the can down the road.”  😉

First, we have to be able to show it clearly is the tenants fault or responsibility. If necessary, we will handle any push back from a tenant that is reluctant to pay. In these circumstances, we need to be able to collect money from the tenant to keep it from impacting the property owner, but if we have a tenant not paying for something they are responsible for, effectively breaking their lease, there are actions we can take.

Whether it’s being behind on payments, damaging the property, breaking rules, or any other violation of the lease we quickly move to correct the situation. They are served a notice, and if needed, turned over to the attorney for eviction. Of course we always hope it doesn’t come to that and usually we can get it worked out without needing to evict, but it just depends on the tenants actions.

It is most likely because you never provided evidence of renters insurance or the evidence of insurance you last provided had expired and you never provided updated information showing your continued coverage. As a result, you were automatically enrolled into the default “liability only” insurance program for $9.50 per month. If you have renewed your own insurance please provide evidence of it so we can turn off this default insurance for future months – until your own insurance expires again. As explained in the reminder emails that are sent out to all tenants, and in the welcome letter your received when you first moved in, I’m not able to reverse those charges. You were actually enrolled into a policy and it costs $9.50 per month. It happens automatically when your insurance expires, if you haven’t provide updated evidence of insurance.

To request approval for an ESA or Service Animal there are some forms you and your doctor need to fill out and turn in. Please understand that the rental industry has been over run with fraud when it comes to these requests. Many people think that calling their pet an emotional support animal is simply a way to get around the rules. The fact is, it is fraud and it is illegal. Because so many people do this it makes things much more difficult for those that have true medical needs. As defined by the law, these people must have a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life functions and they need their animal to help them perform those major life functions. Because so many people have been committing fraud by illegally saying they need an ESA, when in reality it’s just a pet, I have to do my due diligence before I can approve your request.

To get an animal approved you need to fit the definition of handicapped as defined by the law: “Handicap” means, with respect to a person –

(1) having a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more of such person’s major life activities
(2) having a record of having such an impairment, or
(3) being regarded as having such an impairment, but such term does not include current, illegal use of or addiction to a controlled substance.

If you fit that definition you and your doctor need to fill out some forms that can be provided to you, signing your names that you fit the definition. Your doctor will then be contacted by our office to verify the information and then you will be informed if your request has been approved. The animal is not allowed at the property until this process is completed and approval has been granted.

If your lease is expiring, or you are month to month, you need to email the office, or submit a notice of move out from your online portal, giving at least a 30 day notice and informing us of the exact date that will be your last day. If you do not know an exact date for your move out, then you are not able to give a proper notice to move. Please also review the Checkout Form in the tenants section of this website.

You first need to email the office and let us know of the situation so we can give you the paperwork and instructions of how to proceed and what to expect. It is not a problem, but it will be your responsibility to find someone to take over your lease. Their application will need to be approved by our office and they will need to sign a new lease once they are approved. When you are preparing to move out please review the Checkout Form in the tenants section of this website.

What is written in your individual lease takes precident over anything written here, but in general, rent is late after the 1st. On our standard lease, you have a grace period through 5:00pm on the 5th. After the grace period there is always a late fee. The best thing you can do if you need to pay after the 5th, is send an email to our office, BEFORE THE 5TH, letting us know what date it will be paid and then follow through with your promise. Communication is key. You will still be charged a late fee but as long as you communicate beforehand, follow through with your promises – paying in a reasonable time, and pay your late fee, then it’s usually not a big deal. Without communication, or if you don’t follow through with your promises, then we can only assume the worst and we will proceed on those assumptions. If you are going to pay by 5pm on the 5th then there is no need to notify the office.

No. For legal and liability reasons we can not have you move halfway in. Either you are moving in or you are not. If you want to move in earlier than originally planned, we can see if the property will be available, and if it is, we will need to charge you rent for those extra days that you want to start moving in.

We do not issue keys for most of our rental homes. They have a keypad lock on the front door that you will be able to program and change the code on anytime you want. The evening before your move in date, if your rent has been paid, you will receive an email with your move in codes and information. To get this email at the scheduled time, you will need to make sure your rent is paid before the end of the day (5pm) the business day before your move in date. (For example, if you are moving in Monday morning you need to have your account balance paid by 5pm on Friday.)

The fastest and best way to get a regular, non-emergency, maintenance issue resolved is to log into your portal and follow the prompts there to report it. You can do this on our phone app or on a computer. You can also upload pictures with it if needed. Pictures are always extra helpful. If you call, email, or text in your maintenance issue you will be asked to go to your portal and submit the issue there. Please do not submit duplicate maintenance requests for the same issue or submit a maintenance request for non-maintenance issues.

If it is an urgent maintenance emergency where there is an immediate threat to life or property, then call the office. If it’s after hours or we are out of the office, the voicemail greeting will give you an emergency number to call. After making that call, if you can, it’s best to also report it in your portal, as you would with any other maintenance issue, to date and time stamp your description of what happened and to report that you called the emergency crew.

Yes. We have a great system for doing that. Email the office and ask for instructions for paying with cash. You will then get an email with a barcode that you can use at any 7-11 store to pay your rent with cash. They’ll give you a receipt and, if you then log into your portal, you’ll be able to instantly see your account has been updated, showing your rent is paid. Save the barcode and use it anytime in the future.

We don’t usually know. Kasteel Property Management does not own or manage community mailboxes. They are owned and opertated by the post office. If you ask we will direct you to find out from the post office. You might want to try testing which mailbox your key works on but asking the post office might be a more sure way to find out.

If you live in a community where a key is needed for your mailbox and the previous tenant did not leave it (usually in a kitchen drawer or on the counter), you will need to contact the post office to get a new one. Those mailboxes are owned and operated by the post office so we can not help you with it. Usually there is not a fee for getting a new key if you tell them you just moved in. If there is still a fee we can charge the previous tenants security deposit for loosing it and then give you a credit towards your rent, but only if you send us a receipt within one week of your move in date. Emailing the receipt is the best way to turn it in. Just make sure your name and address is on it with a description of what it is for.

We review credit, criminal background, verify employment and income, and check with previous landlords.

We aren’t looking for a particular credit score as much as we are looking to see that you pay your bills, that you’re not currently having financial difficulties, and that there are not people trying to collect money from you that aren’t getting paid.

Yes, if you do not qualify on your own, we might still consider your application with a co-signer. The co-signer would need to apply too and, if approved, be willing to sign the lease with you and will be responsible for all terms of the lease with you.

Typically, if there are no difficulties in approving your application, we will require the first months rent (prorated) and the deposit, as advertised on the listing.

No. If this is something you need we will determine that the cost of living there is too high for you to afford.

No. The website is always current with what is currently available and with what we know is coming up. Keep an eye on the website though because it changes regularly. If it is not listed on the website, then it is not available.

$0. Because we do not charge an application fee we do require certain things before we will run your application though.

  1. You need to have toured the property.
  2. Each adult needs to have submitted a complete and individual application with a current pay stub and picture ID.
  3. Your preferred move in date needs to be within one week of when the property is available.

Within 24 hours, but usually the same day you submit it. If your application is incomplete, all adults have not submitted individual applications, or we are missing requested documentation, your application will be delayed and other applications can be moved ahead of yours.

Yes, but please understand that our industry has been over run with fraud when it comes to these requests. Many people think that calling their pet an emotional support animal is simply a way to get around the rules. The fact is, it is fraud and it is illegal. Because so many people do this it makes things much more difficult for those that have true medical needs. As defined by the law, these people must have a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life functions and they need their animal to help them perform those major life functions. Because so many people have been committing fraud by illegally saying they need an ESA, when in reality it’s just a pet, we have to do our due diligence before we can approve your request.

To get an animal approved you need to fit the definition of handicapped as defined by the law: “Handicap” means, with respect to a person –
(1) having a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more of such person’s major life activities
(2) having a record of having such an impairment, or
(3) being regarded as having such an impairment, but such term does not include current, illegal use of or addiction to a controlled substance.

If you fit that definition you and your doctor need to fill out some forms that I can provide, signing your names that you fit the definition, and return them to our office to request that your animal be approved. We will then contact your Doctor to verify the information and then we will inform you if your request has been approved with your application. If you decide to apply you can request those forms by emailing jeff@kasteelproperty.com. Then upload the completed forms when filling out the application for the property you are interested in.

Yes, although Housing requires an inspection and they will only do their inspection when the home is vacant. So if you are interested in a place for rent but people are still living there, then it is not available yet. In that case, you will need to check back once the people living there have moved out (it’s availability date) and see if it’s still for rent.

No. We do 12 month leases. Most HOA’s also require leases in their communities to be at least 12 months, so if you are checking on different homes in HOA communities you will probably get the same answer from other places. If you sign a 12 month lease, you do have the option of selling your lease if you need to end it early. See the FAQ in the tenants section about ending your lease early.

Have additional questions?